Dave Ramsey’s Entreleadership- A Raving Fan

Hajel's Musings

Dave Ramsey, sharing his play book with us at EntreLeadship Master Series Dave Ramsey, sharing his play book with us at EntreLeadership Master Series

I had the privilege of attending Entreleadership Master Series, a week-long training on Entrepreneurship and Leadership taught by Dave Ramsey in Nashville, Tennessee. Let me start by saying, I will do a great job of sharing the highlights with you, both through pictures and with words, however, that will only scratch the surface of what actually happened at Entreleadership. It must be experienced to be truly understood. It was rich,  rewarding and will totally revamp the way you view business, service and relating with people.

Once we started the process of engaging with the Dave Ramsey team to attend Entreleadership, you felt “special”, you felt like they wanted to “serve” you and help you succeed. This was a theme that ran through my engagement with them: on our first night in Nashville, we checked into our hotel room and…

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TOWARDS GOOD GOVERNANCE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT by Temitope Adewoye

The term governance has being defined by the World Bank to mean “the manner in which power is exercised in the management of a country’s economic and social resources for development’

The concept of ‘governance’ is not new. It is as old as human civilization. Simply put it means the process of decision-making and the process by which decision are implemented.

Basically, while governance is the exercise of authority-political, economic and administrative to manage national resources and affairs, good governance is the art of making the government more receptive and accountable to the needs and aspiration of its populace.

Good governance has eight major characteristics; It is Participatory, Consensus oriented, accountable, transparent, responsive, effective, equitable, inclusive and follows the rule of law. It ensures that corruption is minimized, the views of the minorities are taken into account and the voices of the most vulnerable in society are heard in decision making. It is responsive to the present and future needs of society.

Good governance is a precondition for sustainable development of every sector of the nation. While good governance can improve development effectiveness, sustainable development enhances a good system of government that preserves the wealth of a nation for generations yet unborn.

So why this epistle you might ask?  I honestly do not intend to play the blame game because it won’t lead us anywhere however I seek to bring to our consciousness that as young people we do have power to begin to bring about the change we need in our obviously corrupt society.

Lets begin to think of ways to promote democratic principles, promote the respect for human and   peoples rights , promote co-operation in all fields of human activity  so as to raise the living standard of the Nigerian nation.

I believe in one Nigeria, I believe that our struggles are labour pains preceding the birth of a new, strong and blooming Nigeria.

HAPPY NEW MONTH!

 

 

THINK LOCAL, ACT GLOBAL by Temitope Adewoye

A few days ago, a couple of friends were discussing about the economic situation of my country Nigeria. Someone asked a question; how can we build products and services indigenous to us and make them internationally acceptable

The question got me thinking

  1. What products are indigenous to us?
  2. How do we improve on them
  3. What are the processes involved in making them globally acceptable?

Well I decided to share my thoughts with you guys and brainstorm together

The famous football clubs Real Madrid and Manchester United are phenomenally successful and wealthy football teams not by eschewing their locale but by emphasizing it.

Emma Bridgewater ceramics is fashionable and pricey because it is still made by hand in the historic home of British pottery, Stoke-On-Trent

Italian fashion maintains its luster and its margins not by outsourcing manufacturing to china but by using and showcasing local textiles and intricate handiwork.

By nurturing and articulating local roots these guys have built successful brands. Please share your thought on this.

PATENTS by Temitope Adewoye

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A patent is a form of intellectual property. It consists of a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state to an inventor or their assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for the public disclosure of an invention.

Under the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property rights, patents should be available in WTO member states for any invention, in all fields of technology, and the term of protection available should be a minimum of twenty years.

A patent basically provides the right to exclude others from making, using, selling, offering for sale, or importing the patented invention for the term of the patent, which is usually 20 years from the filling date, subject to the payment of maintenance fees.

Patents allow the creator of certain kinds of inventions that contain new ideas to keep others from making commercial use of those ideas without the creator’s permission. For example, Sarah invents a new type of Phone that has fantastic functions. Not only can Sarah keep others from making, selling, or using the precise type of phone she invented, but she may also be able to apply his patent monopoly rights to prevent people from making commercial use of any similar type of phone during the time the patent is in effect (20 years from the date the patent application is filed). (to be continued)

There are three basic types of patents utility patents, design patents, and plant patents.

For all utility patents filed before July 8, 2012, the patent term is 20 years from date of filing, or 17 years from date of issuance, whichever period is longer. For utility patents filed on or after July 8, 2012, the patent term is 20 years from the date of filing. For design patents, the period is 14 years from date of issuance. For plant patents, the period is 17 years from date of issuance.

To qualify for a utility patent, an invention must be;

  • A machine (usually something with moving parts or circuitry, such as a cigarette lighter, sewage treatment system, laser, or photocopier)
  • A process or method for producing a useful, concrete, and tangible result (such as a genetic engineering procedure, an investment strategy, computer software, or a process for conducting e-commerce on the Internet)
  • An article of manufacture (such as an eraser, tire, transistor, or hand tool)
  • A composition of matter (such as a chemical composition, drug, soap, or genetically altered life-form)
  • An improvement of an invention that fits within one of the first four categories

A patent may expire if its owner fails to pay required maintenance fees. Usually this occurs because attempts to commercially exploit the underlying invention have failed and the patent owner chooses to not throw good money after bad.

Patent protection ends if a patent is found to be invalid. This may happen if someone shows that the patent application was insufficient or that the applicant committed fraud on the PTO, usually by lying or failing to disclose the applicant’s knowledge about prior art that would legally prevent issuance of the patent. A patent may also be invalidated if someone shows that the inventor engaged in illegal conduct when using the patent — such as conspiring with a patent licensee to exclude other companies from competing with them.

Once a patent has expired, the invention described by the patent falls into the public domain: it can be used by anyone without permission from the owner of the expired patent. The basic technologies underlying television and personal computers are good examples of valuable inventions that are no longer covered by in-force patents.

The fact that an invention is in the public domain does not mean that subsequent developments based on the original invention are also in the public domain. Rather, new inventions that improve public domain technology are constantly being conceived and patented. For example, televisions and personal computers that roll off today’s assembly lines employ many recent inventions that are covered by in-force patents.

The following items are just some of the things that might qualify for patent protection: biological inventions; business methods; carpet designs; new chemical formulas, processes, or procedures; clothing accessories and designs; computer hardware and peripherals; computer software; containers; cosmetics; decorative hardware; e-commerce techniques; electrical inventions; electronic circuits; fabrics and fabric designs; food inventions; furniture design; games (board, box, and instructions); housewares; Internet innovations; jewelry; laser light shows; machines; magic tricks or techniques; mechanical inventions; medical accessories and devices; medicines; musical instruments; odors; plants; recreational gear; and sporting goods (designs and equipment).

 

Life saving Soap by Temitope Adewoye

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Bridget Hilton the 26 old Co-founder of jack’s soap founded in 2011 with the goal of saving life’s through soap. Bridget Hilton the founder of Jack’s Soap could not live with this statistics in mind so she took action and over a period of three months, she created and launched a for-profit company that donates soaps to children in need, for every bar of soap sold.

                    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To ensure the perpetuation of good hygienic practices, Jack’s doesn’t just donate the soaps but also educates the recipients about the importance of good hygiene. These luxurious soaps are made with organic ingredients, use recycled packaging materials, and are vegan and cruelty free–making them both PETA and USDA approved

Connect;

Jack’s Soap Website: www.JacksSoap.com

Jack’s Soap on Facebook: www.facebook.com/jacksoap

Jack’s Soap on Twitter; @JackSoap

Bridget Hilton on Linkedin; http://www.Linkedin.com/in/BridgetHilton

 

 

 

START by Kehinde Olagbenjo

I was very surprised this morning when a guy selling bread at the road side asked my brother to accompany him to the car dealership in other to buy an 18 seater Bus! I was also informed that the same guy had built a house, was married with three kids.

This guy graduated many years ago, searched for jobs and could not gain employment. In other to survive he was determined to get engaged in menial jobs. He began to sell bread at the T-Junction of a major road in Lagos. Today he is financially stable, doing better than most graduates in paid employment.

A lot of young people are unemployed as a result of laziness and pride. They are not willing to get their hands dirty and do the required hard work like the rich do. There is dignity in labour even in carrying out menial jobs. Creativity would differentiate you from the other person doing same;all you need is packaging.

If you must make money, be ready to work hard, money should not be your priority in the first place, providing a service that gives value should be topmost on your list. Don’t be deceived by your degree there are a lot of graduates who are jobless and broke. Find something doing.
Someone earning Ten thousand Naira  monthly is better than someone hoping to earn Two Hundred Thousand Naira monthly. The journey of a thousand miles begins with a step.

Start something today

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE 2012 by Temitope Adewoye

There’s an ongoing revolution in Nigeria right now, young people all over the country, are organizing themselves, developing roadmaps and solutions to problems, taking responsibility for their future. The Business management Conference 2012 which took place this weekend at the Farm Centre, Ministry of Agriculture& Cooperatives, Oko Oba, Agege, Lagos is one of such youth platforms aimed at preparing participants for the demands of the 21st century workplace, igniting the spirit of entrepreneurship and encouraging startup businesses in Nigeria. The conference was organized by these young Nigerians; Asenime Gregory, Abiodun Dominic, Ojeyinka Tolulope, Araba Steve and Airhunuoje Micheal

The facilitators of the various group sessions included; Frank Osodi of House of Bunor Crezioni,  Funke Bucnor-Obruthe of ZAPPHAIRE EVENTS, Bunmi Davies of Afrotainment and Tayo Olosunde; principal partner of E-Green Limited(an Enterprise Sustainability Human capital and corporate Social Investment Management Firm).

Tayo Olosunde (E-Green services) facilitated the first session spoke on Branding: In this session, the topic of Brand Management was strategically looked into to position participants for entrepreneurial success.

Mr. Aderinwale Ayodele (Executive Director, Africa Leadership Forum) facilitated the second session; he spoke on the Mind of an entrepreneur:

 Frank Osodi (House of Bunor) facilitated the session on fashion
Tosin Babajide (Broad Vision) facilated the Waste recycling session; participants interested in the waste recycling business, were given hands on practical advice on how to start and run the business

Bunmi Davies (Afrotainment) facilitated the session on media and showbiz; Participants whose interest lies in the media/entertainment industry received apt mentorship from one of the nation’s leading media brand thus positioning them for a successful media business venture

Johnson Abbaly (Achievers consortium) facilitated the session on management for startups

Prof. Abby Awosika-Fapetu (Executive Director, OASIS Education) facilitated thesession on financial management for startups during the session; participants irrespective of line of chosen trade were given practical and insightful tips on how to go about accessing and managing funds for their entrepreneurial endeavours.

Connect with BMC:

Telephone Numbers: 08051787296, 08181059411

Email address: info@bmc.org.ng

Website: www.bmc.org.ng

The following are pictures from the event:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tayo Olosunde giving a session on Branding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tayo Olosunde receiving a plaque from the organizers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cross session of participants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Participants taking notes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The organizers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abiodun Odunugha and I

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tayo Elegbede and I

Think!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that the “Happy Birthday” song was not copyrighted until a smart woman did the research and discovered it was in the public domain?

She was granted a copyright, and each time you hear the song being played on air she gets a royalty.

In the 1960’s some of the major American Car companies had failed to properly Copyright and Trademark there in Europe. It was a multimillion-dollar mistake. One enterprising young college student discovered the oversight and went from country to country in Europe doing the necessary legal work to ‘Capture’ the name.

In order to sell their cars in Europe, these companies ended up paying him in millions in licensing fees